Paul Eddington as Captain Schulman in the episode ‘I’m Afraid You Got the Wrong Number’ from the second series of Danger Man a.k.a. Secret Agent (1966)

And I’m also afraid to say that I now have more than a slight crush on the man…

Sep 29 · reblog

harrietvane:

-A natural conspirator, Iā€™d say.

-Yes, well, one knows another.

My favourite medieval crime-fighting duo (and Hugh Beringar is always played by Sean Pertwee in my head, no matter who came after him).

Sep 25 · 25 notes · reblog

ā€œ
What I thought I’d occupy myself [with] during the first few months [on a desert island] is learning all the Shakespearean parts that I’ve ever wanted to play. Parts like Richard III and Hamlet and Iago and then I’d play them to an appreciative audience of seagulls and I would enjoy myself enormously for a few months doing that.
ā€”

Sinead Cusack speaking to Roy Plomley on Desert Island Discs, 28 May 1983 (x)

A delightful interview/episode of Desert Island Discs, I must say, and I for one would certainly would love to see her try her hand at playing Richard III, Hamlet and Iago!

Sep 24 · 11 notes · reblog


'He's thirty-eight but could be ten years younger. He's soft in face and figure, even chubby, but although he's no sex symbol his diffidence about his looks seems excessive. His voice is his chief asset. He speaks with the perfect Oxford enunciation of the English theatre and his tones are sonorous and mellifluent as to invest even his most ordinary conversation with apparently profound significance.'

Derek Jacobi 
Photographed by Lord Snowdon, 1977

'He's thirty-eight but could be ten years younger. He's soft in face and figure, even chubby, but although he's no sex symbol his diffidence about his looks seems excessive. His voice is his chief asset. He speaks with the perfect Oxford enunciation of the English theatre and his tones are sonorous and mellifluent as to invest even his most ordinary conversation with apparently profound significance.'

Derek Jacobi

Photographed by Lord Snowdon, 1977

Sep 24 · 10 notes · reblog

Sep 23 · 16 notes · reblog


Portraits from the Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Chris Evans

Portraits from the Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Chris Evans

Sep 22 · 9 notes · reblog

Pardon Goddess of the Night
Philip Dennis - Much Ado About Nothing (6)

Not only did the 1982 Royal Shakespeare Company production of Much Ado About Nothing have splendid actors, costumes and set designs, it also had an equally splendid soundtrack composed by the very talented Nigel Hess.

I’ve long been familiar with Patrick Doyle’s version of ‘Pardon Goddess of the Night’ for Kenneth Branagh’s 1993 film so Hess’ interpretation here, sung by Philip Dennis, is interesting (and equally moving) to say the very least. It also makes me wish for the umpteenth time that I could have seen the production.

Sep 22 · 2 notes · reblog

Just received this thing of beauty through the post! Way back in 1977, the Prospect Theatre Company made a tour round the UK, the Middle East and Eastern Europe with their new production of Hamlet directed by Toby Robertson and with Derek Jacobi as the prince. It was so popular that they revived it two years later in 1979 (by this time Prospect had merged with the Old Vic Company) and embarked on another tour round Denmark, Australia and the Far East, two highlights including being able to perform it at Elsinore and having the achievement of being the first English-speaking Hamlet performed in the People’s Republic of China.

As a result of this revival, a LP recording was made that same year with a tape cassette version following on afterwards. I haven’t tried playing this yet but I’m definitely looking forward to listening to it. I’m curious to see how much or how little it differs from the 1980 BBC production I’ve come to know and love!

Sep 22 · 4 notes · reblog

bantarleton:

The weapons and equipment of British warriors down the ages, from top to bottom;

Huscarl, 1066

Crusader knight, 1244

Longbowman, 1415

Yorkist Man-at-Arms, 1485

New Model Army musketeer 1645

Private, 1709

Corporal, 1815

Private, 1916

Lance Corporal, 1944

Private, 2014

These sorts of things always fascinate me, particularly seeing that I’m sort of obsessed with military costumes and equipment. Particularly during the Napoleonic Wars period.

Sep 21 · 20,631 notes · reblog


Simon Ward replicating Yousuf Karsh’s famous 1941 portrait of Winston Churchill 
Photographed by Yousuf Karsh, c. 1972

I rewatched Young Winston last week (mostly because my mum is at the moment reading Anne Sebba’s biography of Churchill’s American mother, Jennie Jerome) and was once again struck by how uncannily similar Simon Ward was to the young Churchill (and even the older one, at least here). And this time I was doubly struck by the strong resemblance he shares with his daughter, Sophie Ward, who of course played Minnie ‘Pet’ Meagles in the 1987 Little Dorrit…so you can guess my state of confusion for the entire two-hour plus duration of the film.
The film’s timeline is alas all over the place but the cinematography, costumes and not to mention the acting are superb. Highly recommended if you want a crash course into Churchill’s early (and rather exciting) life.

Simon Ward replicating Yousuf Karsh’s famous 1941 portrait of Winston Churchill

Photographed by Yousuf Karsh, c. 1972

I rewatched Young Winston last week (mostly because my mum is at the moment reading Anne Sebba’s biography of Churchill’s American mother, Jennie Jerome) and was once again struck by how uncannily similar Simon Ward was to the young Churchill (and even the older one, at least here). And this time I was doubly struck by the strong resemblance he shares with his daughter, Sophie Ward, who of course played Minnie ‘Pet’ Meagles in the 1987 Little Dorrit…so you can guess my state of confusion for the entire two-hour plus duration of the film.

The film’s timeline is alas all over the place but the cinematography, costumes and not to mention the acting are superb. Highly recommended if you want a crash course into Churchill’s early (and rather exciting) life.

Sep 20 · 2 notes · reblog